Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview
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boards of three or five men in the courthouses and city halls of North Carolina no longer have the power to mortgage the future of their communities by plastering unlimited mortgages on the property of their taxpayers through restricted issuance of bonds and notes. It also passed the university consolidation act under which the University of North Carolina located at Chapel Hill, the North Carolina State College of Agriculture and Engineering located at Raleigh, and the North Carolina College for Women located at Greensboro are consolidated into the University of North Carolina.

Perhaps the most revolutionary act of our last General Assembly was the legislation by virtue of which the State itself assumed complete maintenance of the 45,000 miles of county and township roads which were outside of the state highway system. I say that this was perhaps the most revolutionary action because of the fact that the local road administration was inherently the weakest link--the most cumbersome and most inefficient service rendered by the counties and townships of my State. Generally speaking, counties did not have any accurate information as to the amount of their road mileage, as to its cost, or as to the status of their indebtedness for roads.

In the capital city of the state of Virginia, however, I do not believe that one would lose caste in using the term "revolutionary." Throughout the history of this Commonwealth its leaders have consistently removed the stigma from the terms "revolutionist" and "rebel."

The progressive legislation enacted in my State within the past two years was not accomplished without a great deal of hard work and stubborn fight. It is my observation that no one is ever persecuted for advocacy of a progressive program until progress cuts across established and well accepted policies. But whenever a progressive program cuts into the status quo, there generally follows a declaration of war.

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Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933
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