Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

state of North Carolina must not only exhaust every resource at its command to bring about the indictment, conviction, and punishment of those guilty of mob violence, but I feel that under the circumstances surrounding this case the process itself should be carried on in the open and exposed to full view of an interested public. I need not add, for the reassurance of that vast majority of our citizenship concerned in the preservation of orderly processes of government, that the State will spare no effort to uphold and vindicate the law in this case.


CHARITABLE AND WELFARE AGENCIES TO BE ENLARGED

JANUARY 3, 1930

Definite steps were taken by Governor Gardner today for the purpose of enlarging and making more effective the work of the State's charitable and welfare agencies. A reported increase of distress in a number of communities which have been hard hit by floods, unemployment, and crop failures due to other causes was the cause of this move on the part of the State's chief executive.

At a conference held in the governor's office this morning and attended by Doctor Charles O'H. Laughinghouse, state health officer, Mrs. Thomas O'Berry, representing the State Federation of Women's Clubs, Mrs. Kate Burr Johnson, state welfare officer, Mrs. Jane S. McKimmon, state home demonstration agent, and Mrs. Raymond Binford, head of the State Parent

____________________
John G. Carpenter, Governor Gardner assigned Judge Thomas J. Shaw to hold hearings, beginning November 4, and to sit as a committing magistrate in connection with the outbreak of lawlessness which occurred in Gaston County on September 14 and which resulted in the death of Ella Mae Wiggins. This action followed the failure of a Gaston County grand jury to indict anyone for the outbreak or the killing.
32

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