Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

--each judge imposing sentences in accordance with his own view of the law and the evidence--and also recognize that it is most difficult to lay down a hard and fast uniform rule when each case must stand on its own merit, yet I do feel it my duty at this time to say to the public that it will be the policy of this office not to interfere with the sentences of the courts in the above mentioned class of cases, unless there is developed new evidence or the health of the prisoner is gravely jeopardized by further confinement. Prisoners of the character mentioned, differing from ordinary criminals, are almost universally able to have their cases presented ably to the courts and are rarely without powerful friends. What I mean to say is that the sentences of the court in such cases will stand unless discovery reveals an entirely different condition from that prevailing at the time of the trial and the imposition of sentence.


REDUCTION OF COTTON CROP NECESSARY

DECEMBER 9, 1930

I am absolutely convinced that a cotton crop of 14,000,000 bales of American cotton next year would furnish a final knockout for the South. There is no economic escape from the fact that with our huge carryover of 8,000,000 bales and reduced world consumption of American cotton, we are looking eight cent cotton squarely in the eye in 1931 if we make another normal crop. If the leaders of Southern agriculture do not make a united drive to reduce our cotton acreage next year our situation will be deplorable. In 1926 we made our biggest crop of cotton, 18,000,000 bales, and received eleven cents per pound. In 1927 we made onethird less cotton, namely 12,000,000 bales, and received twenty cents per pound. I am convinced that our

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