Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

APPOINTMENT OF CONSOLIDATION COMMISSION OF THE UNIVERSITY

JUNE 20, 1931

It is generally known that I regard the consolidation of the University of North Carolina, North Carolina State College, and North Carolina College for Women into the greater University of North Carolina as being the greatest permanent contribution to higher education in North Carolina made in this generation. The commission appointed for the study and reorganization of these institutions has the opportunity of guiding this undertaking along sound and practical lines and of preventing our making costly mistakes. I am fully conscious of the delicate elements involved in the proposal--elements of sentiment, institutional entity, and pride of position. Yet I feel that these three great institutions, each supported by the people of the State, should henceforth work more closely together and strive more unitedly for the betterment and the upbuilding of North Carolina.

I have given most careful consideration to every phase of the movement; and in the appointment of the men and women to represent the State at large, I have chosen each with an eye single to his fitness, equipment and ability to go into the whole subject with complete personal and academic freedom.

There will be twelve members of the consolidation commission of which the governor is ex officio chairman, six of whom shall be appointed by the three institutions and six by myself. The University of North Carolina will be represented on the commission by Dr. Frank Graham and Dr. Louis R. Wilson; State College by Dr. E. C. Brooks and Dr. W. C. Riddick; North Carolina College for Women by Dr. J. I. Foust and Dr. Benjamin J. Kendrick.

The representatives appointed by me are as follows:

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