Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

election in Great Britain yesterday. I believe the results of this election will have a most wholesome effect throughout Europe and strongly tend to strengthen public confidence in the United States. It demonstrated beyond question the inherent capacity of the British to face an emergency, look it squarely in the eye and carry on.

If by some magic we in North Carolina could regain our faith in ourselves and each other, in our institutions and agencies of public and private service, the whole face of the State would be transformed within sixty days.

We should remember that there has been no change in the basic character of our people. We are the same we have always been and North Carolina possesses everything she ever possessed except money. And some day we can make money again if we do not turn yellow and quit. We must carry on in North Carolina.


AGRICULTURAL SITUATION AND COTTON LEGISLATION

NOVEMBER 23, 1931

It is not my purpose to attend the cotton conference called by Governors Bilbo of Mississippi and Parnell of Arkansas to meet at Jackson, Mississippi, November 23, and I have so written each of them.

My invitation to this conference states that the conference is being called to make plans for uniform legislation to reduce cotton acreage in 1932. I have advised Governors Bilbo and Parnell that I am in full sympathy with the policy of acreage reduction; that for two years North Carolina has been constructively committed to reduction in cotton acreage and to an increasing substitution of food and feed crops as cotton

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