Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

that he is continuously trying to make a better man of himself. These investigations are being made for those who ask clemency and for those for whom no one speaks --the forgotten man.

I can think of nothing more unchristian than for organized society to refuse aid to a convicted prisoner who is honestly and earnestly trying to reform and become a good citizen. In the issuance of paroles some mistakes are sure to be made just as some mistakes may be made in the trial.

When a mistake is discovered the parole is revoked and the prisoner made to serve the rest of his sentence. As Governor Aycock said, "It is not those that I have turned out that give me most concern, it is those whose pleas I never heard."

I have absolute confidence that the humane and Christian people of North Carolina support me as I try to restore some hope to human beings who have lost hope. I shall continue to exercise the constitutional power of pardon and parole fearlessly, humbly, and with due regard for the best interests of society and the welfare of the prisoner.


NATHAN O'BERRY'S DEATH

JANUARY 5, 1932

I am greatly distressed.

In my generation the State has not had a more patriotic or valuable public servant. Captain O'Berry died literally at work. At the meeting of the Council of State Monday, he asked that the business be transacted as rapidly as possible in order that he might return to his duties. Later in the day, I visited him in his own office and found him at his desk signing state bonds.

-537-

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