Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

as reflected on the stage form an important solvent for the broken spirits as we temper the wind to the shorn lamb.

This is your great commission and I predict that people reflecting the exuberance of your own spirits, will forget the tragedies and despair of their lives, and subscribe to the supreme law of your profession, namely--that neither life nor death, things present or things to come, shall deter us from our great resolution --"the show must go on."


BLIGHT OF ECONOMIC CONDITIONS*

JANUARY 22, 1932

North Carolina, along with every state in the Union, is today suffering under the blight of economic conditions prevailing throughout the world. The encouraging ray of light and hope for us in North Carolina is seen in the fact that our citizenship and our government have recognized conditions for what they are and have made stupendous efforts to adjust themselves to weather the storm. In some important respects North Carolina was the last state to feel substantially the effects of the business panic. We had made comprehensive plans to adjust our operations to its demands even before its ravages began to shrink revenues. We have put our house in order. We have not only adjusted our operations to live through it, but when its weight lifts, this State will surely be one of the first to be able to move from the present plans and push ahead with accelerated progress.

Therefore, I feel, after having made a survey of the whole national situation, that it is not unreasonable to

____________________
*
This statement was made by Governor Gardner on his return from Washington and New York where he conferred with persons in the financial and political centers of the country.

-544-

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