Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

better. Let them be specific. . . . This is no time to follow the man who hovers. Beware of the patriot appealing for votes who hovers over the prejudice of each individual voter and promises everything to every man. Make him light, make him fly, don't let him hover!

For myself, I am ready and willing to follow that man who offers something better, more just, more efficient.

If I were called upon to name the next governor of this State, knowing the heavy responsibilities which will confront him, I should name the ablest, the fairest, the most fearless, and most courageous man available and then pray that he will live through the four years of his term.


LOCAL GOVERNMENT COMMISSION RENDERING VALUABLE SERVICE*

APRIL 2, 1932

I think it would be of interest to the people of the State, if they knew something of the administration and the economies which have been effected through the operation of the Local Government Commission. There is no branch of the state government rendering a more constructive or worthwhile service to the people of this State than this commission and no law was ever more needed.

As an illustration of the operation of the Local Government Commission, I cite the instance of the trend of reduction in the issuance of new bonds since this law went into operation. The law went into effect March 18, 1931, and for one-year period only $810,600 of new bonds have been issued by the counties, cities, and towns of the State, all local units, and of this

____________________
*
The above statement was made after a conference with Charles M. Johnson, director of the Local Government Commission.

-546-

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