Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

ment by mutual agreement is most hopeful, and I rejoice that at High Point all seamless hosiery mills will begin operating again Monday morning. I sincerely trust that our experience today will serve as a basis of adjustment for difficulties of a similar kind which may arise in the future in North Carolina. This is a happy day for High Point and for North Carolina.

Mr. Waynick did a great piece of work, and I wish to thank him and tell the people of the State that he should have a great share of the credit for the satisfactory settlement of the strike.


APPOINTMENT OF FRED W. MORRISON

AUGUST 5, 1932

Under the relief act the administration of all funds is entrusted solely to the responsibility of the governor to be expended under plans made and put into effect by him. The administration of relief funds in the period immediately in front of us is a most important duty and would place upon the governor an unusual burden if personally administered. The act provides that the governor may delegate this responsibility, and I have appointed Dr. Morrison as my personal representative in this highly important work.

I am particularly pleased to be able to find one so well qualified to perform this duty. I seriously doubt if there is a man in the State better informed on all the questions relating to its social and economic welfare than Dr. Morrison and he enjoys my confidence to the highest degree. He is at work now with Mrs. Bost of the Welfare Department and the other state agencies in preparation of a statement of the needs of North Carolina to be presented by brief to the Reconstruction Finance Corporation.

-558-

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