Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview
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Dr. Morrison's work as director will require a certain amount of rearrangement of his work as executive secretary of the Tax Commission. While he will retain his position as executive secretary, it has been arranged for Revenue Commissioner A. J. Maxwell, who is chairman of the Tax Commission, to assume major responsibility for drafting the findings and recommendations of the Tax Commission which will be presented in its official report to the 1933 General Assembly. The studies and research which the commission has been conducting as basis for its forthcoming report have been planned and most of them have been well under way for some time, and there will be no change of policy in the commission and no delay in bringing out its report as directed by statute.

I have decided not to set up a commission to administer whatever funds may be received from the Federal government for supplying the needs of the State; but shall rely upon the administration of these funds through existing agencies, expanded sufficiently to carry the extra load.

I want to take this occasion again to remind the people of the State, cities, and counties that this Federal relief, when obtained, is to act as a supplement to rather than a substitute for the normal efforts of local communities to coöperate in taking care of destitution and need within the community. The need this winter is going to be greater than in the past and it was in recognition of this fact that Congress passed this relief legislation. Therefore, there must be no let-up on the part of our people who are assisting in carrying this burden. The needs of North Carolina will not be heard by the Reconstruction Finance Corporation before early in September, at which time it is hoped to have all the required information necessary to present a complete picture of the social and economic situation in North Carolina.

-559-

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Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933
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