Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

FEDERAL AID FUNDS* TO BE DISTRIBUTED
FAIRLY AND WITHOUT ABUSE

AUGUST 23, 1932

No other work of my administration is more important or more difficult than the systematic planning for the distribution of whatever Federal funds may be made available for preventing want and relieving destitution.

To see that the fund serves its purpose fairly and without abuse, as supplemental aid to local effort, is a real problem. I have gone over the preliminary plans of Dr. Morrison, developed in conference and coöperation with Mrs. Bost, Mr. Jeffress, and other state agencies, and I am well pleased with the progress which is being made. It will, of course, be sometime before actual distribution will be started and the needs of North Carolina fairly ascertained. It is well for our people to remember that whatever Federal aid we receive will be based upon need and not upon population and the Federal government will not supply any funds until I certify that the local units are unable to make provision for local needs and it is well to remember too that this Federal aid is a supplement to, rather than a substitute for, state and local aid.

It will, of course, be sometime before actual distribution will be started but the ground work is being systematically laid so that when demands become heavy they can be met.

It is hoped that a statement of the North Carolina situation will be presented to the Reconstruction Finance Corporation early in September.

____________________
*
The above statement was made after a conference with Dr. Fred W. Morrison, director of Federal relief in North Carolina.

-560-

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