Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

where peace and settlement is imperative. Within the limits of my authority, moral and legal, I am exercising the power of my office to end the strike, but as yet no definite progress has been made. I shall continue negotiations and have directed Dr. Julian S. Miller of the Relief Organization to visit Rockingham today and give me an immediate report on the condition there.


ROCKINGHAM STRIKE STILL UNSETTLED

SEPTEMBER 26, 1932

There is nothing for the present I have to say with respect to the strike situation in Rockingham. I insist on believing that a policy of give and take will ultimately prevail.

A few weeks ago there were labor difficulties in seven industrial enterprises in the State, involving more than 8,000 workers. These have been settled except in Rockingham, where 1,200 employees are still in idleness.

I had hoped in my application for relief in Washington this week I could report that there were no strikes remaining in North Carolina to aggravate our problem of destitution and human need. The Reconstruction Finance Corporation requires that the State submit all available data dealing with unemployment as a condition precedent to its allocation of funds to meet the needs of each state under the act of Congress. I regard it as my duty to do everything possible to aid in reducing unemployment to the lowest possible point; and if I had no other reason, as a matter of state policy to tender the services of myself and the government to the hopeful solution of the controversy in Rockingham, the pressing demands of need and destitution justify my efforts in trying to settle these strikes and to put back to work every able-bodied citizen of the State.

-562-

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