Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

ELEVATOR BOY FOR FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT

OCTOBER 27, 1932

Upon my recent visits to New York City I made it a policy to discuss the progress of the presidential campaign with taxi drivers, elevator boys, and the rank and file of citizens in the city. I often find their opinions just as interesting as the views of acknowledged leaders in business and in politics. Today I received a letter from Mr. Talmo Costales, an Italian elevator boy at 245 Fifth Avenue, New York City, expressing his admiration for Governor Roosevelt and enclosing three one dollar bills as a contribution to the campaign chest of the Democratic National Committee.

The following is a copy of Mr. Costales' letter:

I am the elevator operator at 245 Fifth Ave., New York City, who took you up to the eighteenth floor to see Mr. Florsheim on August 26, 1932; you asked my opinion concerning Governor Roosevelt and President Hoover. I told you how greatly I admired Governor Roosevelt and what I thought of President Hoover.

I don't suppose you recall the incident, but I mentioned the fact that I would like to contribute a few dollars to the Roosevelt campaign committee, which I am enclosing. I am sorry that it cannot be more, but it is all I can spare.

Every night after work I visit different friends of mine most of them Latin-Americans who do not understand English very well. I explain to them that this country needs a man like Governor Roosevelt, and that Hoover has been fooling the people long enough.

I think that Governor Roosevelt will get quite a number of votes from that quarter.

I sincerely hope and believe that Governor Roosevelt will be our next president.

-563-

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