Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

educational institutions, whose traditions have so entered into the hearts of the sons and daughters of the University, of State College, of North Carolina College for Women, and of hundreds of thousands of the men and women of North Carolina that they are in truth the warp and woof of our civilization.

The idea and the thought back of the plan to consolidate the University, State College and the Woman's College into the University of North Carolina is not a new idea. Shortly after I entered State College in 1900 and through my college days at West Raleigh and Chapel Hill, I was impressed with discussions that I heard and read from such distinguished North Carolinians as Chief Justice Walter Clark, Honorable Josephus Daniels, Senator O. F. Mason, and other leaders of that period, who from time to time advanced the idea that there should be a consolidation of the institutions of higher learning of this State. Soon after leaving college I became a member of the General Assembly of North Carolina, where over a period of time, I saw the competition among our institutions as each sought to extend its activities and encroach upon the prerogatives of others. I saw, as the people of North Carolina saw, appropriations to the University, State College and the Woman's College amount from $412,000 annually in 1917 to $1,890,000 in 1929. I saw new departments and new activities, duplication and extensions, occurring with each succeeding session of the General Assembly.

In my service as lieutenant-governor I tried, along with others, to prevent the log-rolling which often took place in the struggles of these institutions before the appropriations committees. I felt then, and I feel now, that the State's appropriations to its educational institutions based upon such contest were not equal and were not for the best interest of its institutions. I realized that the state appropriation came out of one

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