Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

summer to face the issue squarely. I determined to find the best equipped staff of experts in government administration in the country and to engage them to prepare for the consideration of the General Assembly a complete, modern, practical set-up of government reorganization, which would enable and encourage the chief executive actually to administer the government efficiently and intelligently for the public welfare, and which would organize the supporting branches and departments so as to perform the actual services changing conditions demand. I think that this is probably a wise policy, but he ought not to be held responsible and accountable without also being allowed to be competent in the administration of the responsibilities laid upon him. Government in its far reaching ramifications is now the biggest business in this State.

The Brookings Institution of Washington, D. C., agreed to undertake the proposed survey and to devote four months of intensive study to the present organizational set-up of state government, including its relation to local government administration. A staff of four special investigators, headed by Mr. H. P. Seidemann, has been engaged continuously in the survey since July 25. They have personally visited every important department and institution in the State and have studied the work of each department with its head. This report, which is the product of their four months' labor, I commend to the profound consideration of the General Assembly and to the careful study of the thoughtful citizens of the State. It is an important contribution, not only in that it offers a present solution for many of our most pressing problems, but it sets up objectives which, though they are not immediately attainable, will yet give helpful direction and definite purpose to our future efforts in this field of vital governmental reform.

Attention is especially invited to the central thought

-695-

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