The Government of Metropolitan Areas in the United States

By Paul Studenski; Frank H. Sommer et al. | Go to book overview

INDEX
(Note: All suburbs and most counties are listed under the chief city of metropolitan region. Many special metropolitan authorities are similarly indexed.)
Akron (Summit County): metropolitan area as defined by the census bureau, 8, 20; Dumber of political units, 27; sale of water, 55; Metropolitan Park Commission, 279-280, 286, 290, 303-304.
Alameda County: attempt at consolidation of city and county, 66, 372-376; see San Francisco.
Allegheny County: 26; 376-383; see Pittsburgh.
Annexation and Consolidation: (Chapters V, VI, VII and VIII) definition of, 65; extent of, 67-68; special or general laws governing procedure, 68-69; Instances of voluntary or forcible methods, 69-76; arguments pro and con, 75-77; voluntary annexation procedure, 77-79; forcible annexation procedure, 79-82; state and county boundaries cause complications, 82-85; arguments favorable to annexation, 87-88; arguments unfavorable to annexation, 88-90; bases and relative weights of these arguments, 90-93; time required to secure annexation or consolidation, 93-94; cyclical nature of annexation and consolidation movements, 94-95; the terms--legal and contractual, 95-98; obligations assumed by the city, 98-100; representation of new territory in the government of city, 100-104; extension of water supply, 105-110; extension of sewer system, 111-114; street paving In new territory, 114-115; street lighting, 116-117; city planning, 117-120; construction of bridges, viaducts and tunnels, 120-122; expansion of park systems, 122-123; metropolitan transportation, 124-126; police protection, 126-128; fire protection, 128-129; schools, 129-130; street cleaning and garbage removal, 130-131; public health, 131-132; miscellaneous public utility services, 132-133; rapid settlement and increased land values, 133- 134; local civic consciousness in added territories, 134-135; expenditures in added territories exceed revenues, 136-139; equalization of tax rates, 139-141; increase or decrease of expenditures in enlarged city, 141-146; improvement in census rating, 146-149; gains in population through annexation, 149-150; civic and governmental gains, 150-152; limitations upon annexations and consolidations, 152-155.
Areas: boundaries of, 16; growth of metropolitan areas, 18-20; population and area ratios of city and county, 171-173.
Atlanta: metropolitan area as defined by the census bureau, 8; number of political units, 27.
Baltimore: metropolitan area as defined by the census bureau, 8, 20; unincorporated communities in, 26; number of political units, 27; sale of water by, 55, 58; expansion by annexation, 66-68; forcible vs. voluntary annexation, 74-75, table VI, 80; cyclical nature of annexation movements, 94; guarantees furnished by the city in annexations, 98-99; expenditures in added territory, 138; differentials in taxation between urban, suburban and rural properties, 156-161, city-county separation, 173-174; disposi

-391-

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