The Age of Federalism

By Stanley Elkins; Eric McKitrick | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIV
The Settlement

1
The Naval Quasi-War

Considering all the attention that has been given to the troubles with France in the 1790s, most general accounts have had surprisingly little to say about the actual hostilities that ensued from them, or the theater of action in which they occurred, or for that matter the general military, political, economic, and social setting out of which the conflict originated and which gave it the character it had. Exactly what kind of "war" was it, and how had it come about? The Jay Treaty with England -- customarily taken as the starting point for explaining this course of events -- actually did not have a great deal to do with it. More broadly, the official relations between the United States and metropolitan France were no more than a marginal factor in bringing matters to the crisis point. The real key has to be looked for in the French West Indies. There, conditions of social upheaval and revolution, together with invasion by British military forces, had created a dynamic of its own, one which the Directory in Paris showed itself either unable or disinclined to control, except in the most intermittent and desultory way. The consequences for American merchant shipping, as has already been seen, were little short of catastrophic. The main variables of this exceedingly complex situation have their own bearing on the full import of the pending Ellsworth-Murray- Davie mission to France.

If there were any single undertaking by the American government in the closing years of the eighteenth century that could be rated as something close to a full practical success -- in the relation of means to ends, of intentions to outcome, and in obstacles surmounted -- it was that of bringing the United States Navy into being and shaping the manner of its employment during the first two and a half years of its existence. The source of the effort -- and its leading intelligence -- was neither a fleet commander nor a naval careerist of any kind, but a civilian official: the first Secretary of the Navy, Benjamin Stoddert. By the nature of the case it fell upon Stoddert, fortunately a man of great energy and resourcefulness, to superintend everything. Unlike the army, which had at least survived in nominal

-643-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Age of Federalism
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 925

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.