Audience Ratings: Radio, Television, and Cable

By Hugh Malcolm Beville Jr. | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
CAB could deal with telephone no-answers only by excluding them (and consequent substitution). Hooper assumed a no-answer meant that no one was listening, that no one was believed to be at home at the time of the call. Also, CAB measured total audience, which was, by definition, larger than the coincidental's average audience.
2.
New York Stations Ratings Committee and the Committee on Local Television and Radio Measurement (COLTRAM). See Appendix D for a digest of these studies, especially "How Good Is the Television Diary Technique?" a study conducted for COLTRAM by Statistical Research, Inc. in 1975.
3.
The Electronic Media Rating Council (EMRC), for example, does not accredit companies or methodologies. Each individual service must be separately accredited and audited; Nielsen has four and Arbitron three with EMRC accreditation. Each also has nonaccredited services.
4.
The Radio Advertising Bureau Goals Committee has experimented with diaries to produce four-week cumulative data.
5.
Martin Mayer, "The Intelligent Man's Guide to Broadcast Ratings" ( New York: Advertising Research Foundation, 1962).
6.
Standard Definitions of Broadcast Research Terms ( National Association of Broadcasters, Washington, D.C., 1970).
7.
The expected variability range for a rating of 21 would be from 19 to 23 in 67 percent of such samples; in 33 percent, the rating would probably be below 19 or above 23. There is a 95 percent probability that the sample value would fall between 17 and 25. See Appendix D, CONTAM study no. 1, for further details on sample error.
8.
Gale D. Metzger, president, Statistical Research, Inc., "A Plea to End Sloppy Research," Advertising Age, October 26, 1981, p. 52.
9.
A Study of Television Usage in the New York Metropolitan Area ( Westfield N.J.: Statistical Research, Inc., May 1971), p. 23.
10.
"How Good Are Television Ratings? (continued. . . .)", report on a special CONTAM study (no. 4) conducted in April 1969 and presented at the Advertising Research Foundation annual conference, October 14, 1969.
11.
These include: Did coincidental interviewer make two attempts on no- answers and busies? Did they go through operator on nonconnects? Were changed numbers in same code area called immediately?
12.
The three preceding paragraphs are based largely on the Technical Appendix of "How Good Is the Television Diary Technique?" a study conducted by Statistical Research, Inc. in consultation with COLTRAM and published by the National Association of Broadcasters, Washington, D.C., fall. 1976.

-129-

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