The Story of Civil Liberty in the United States

By Leon Whipple | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII
THE DEFENSE OF LIBERTY

THE LIBERTARIANS

CERTAIN aspects of civil liberty in the decade before 1917 are worth noting in conclusion. These include: First, the efforts of certain unpopular minorities struggling for liberty to limit the liberty of other minorities; second, the increased interest in the whole problem of civil liberty; third, the rise of individual libertarians and of organizations devoted to the protection of liberty within the State.

Before 1917 and the common need for many minority groups to resist the war discipline, there was a surprising lack of solidarity among the minority groups themselves. Instead of uniting to defend the principle of liberty, certain elements attacked one another or worked so independently that they gave but little mutual aid. There was small recognition of the need of freedom of thought for everybody. The doctrinaires fought among themselves instead of against common oppression. This was particularly true of the Socialists who sought to prevent the Anarchists from hatching eggs in their nest. For example:

On the occasion of the recent Haywood meeting at the Grand Central Palace ( New York City), some members of the Socialist arrangement committee attempted to prevent our comrades from distributing the leaflet, "To the Unemployed and Homeless," issued by the Anarchist Federation. When persuasions and threats proved futile, the Socialists called the police, insisting especially on the arrest of a young woman who was very active in distributing the leaflets. The police did not appear anxious to

-325-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Story of Civil Liberty in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Foreword v
  • Contents vii
  • Chapter I First Interpretations 1
  • Chapter II the Rights of the People (1830-1860) 49
  • Chapter III the Abolitionists (1830-1860) 84
  • Chapter IV Civil Leberty and Civil War 125
  • Chapter V Race Problems and Civil Liberty 169
  • Chapter Vi. Civil Liberty and Labor 210
  • Chapter VII Freedom of Social Thought 261
  • Chapter VIII the Defense of Liberty 325
  • Reference Notes 331
  • Index 359
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 368

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.