Exporting the American Model: The Post-War Transformation of European Business

By Marie-Laure A. Djelic | Go to book overview

PART III:
CROSS-NATIONAL TRANSFER: MECHANISMS

After the Second World War, a national crisis combined with geopolitical dependence in both France and West Germany to increase the likelihood that the American system of industrial production would become a model for national reconstruction and modernization. A small cross-national network had taken over and held on to key positions of institutional power, both in the USA and in these two Western European countries. Spinning dense webs of personal and institutional relationships across the Atlantic, French, West German, and American members of the cross-national network shared similar objectives and worked together in close synergy. The large-scale transfer to these two Western European countries of structural arrangements--peculiar until then to American industry and understood to be at the source of its success--was, in particular, a key common project.

Substantial differences, however, set apart the French and West German situations. First, the nature of the geopolitical link between the USA and each of these two countries was not the same. The degree of dependence remained higher in the West German case, even after the end of military occupation and well into the mid-1950s. In addition, cross-national channels were quite different. The German element in the cross-national network owed its institutional position of power on the national scene to direct co-optation by American actors. Relationships between these two sides of the network were thus highly asymmetrical. In France the modernizing group had secured national power on its own, using American support only to strengthen its position. Furthermore, amongst French and American members of the network, some were linked through close personal friendship, making for a more symmetrical relationship.

As a consequence of these differences, whether in the degree of geopolitical dependence or in the nature of the cross-national channels, transfer mechanisms were not the same in each case. In the French context, both sides of the cross-national network tended to rely on voluntary imitation as the main mechanism. The French modernizing group spontaneously took upon itself the task of transferring the American structural model to the national economic and industrial scene. The predominance of spontaneous and voluntary imitation in the French case, however, did not prevent the American side of the network from occasionally resorting to more coercive types of transfer mechanisms. Coercive mechanisms could speed up the transfer process.

-129-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Exporting the American Model: The Post-War Transformation of European Business
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 314

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.