The Italian Presence in American Art, 1860-1920

By Irma B. Jaffe | Go to book overview

Within a decade, the Storys would find their final resting places here. 21

Probably no more affecting words were penned in regard to the cemetery than those of Henry James. On visiting the grave of Constance Fenimore Woolson in the cemetery, James wrote to her sister, Clara Woolson Benedict, in 1907 that

The most beautiful thing in Italy, almost, seemed to me in May and June last, the exquisite summery luxuriance and perfect tenderness of that spot. I mean, of course, that very particular spot below the great grey wall, the cypresses and the time-silvered Pyramid. It is tremendously, inexhaustibly touching--its effect never fails to overwhelm.

And James wrote of Story Angel of Grief that

the figure thus produced, unsurpassed, in all his work, for intensity of expression, mingles the sincerity of its message now, for all time, as we may say, with that exquisite, soundless collective voice that nowhere hangs in the golden air with such a weight--resting here, so sensibly, straight upon the heart--as in that flower- smothered corner, beneath the time-silvered Pyramid, where Shelley's ashes supremely ennoble the interest and the passion of his verse, hauntingly, returns upon the beauty; the spot, in a word, at which mind never glances without some fine enjoyment of the fact, even some harmless triumph in it, that the place of sweetest sanctity in all Rome should so oddly chance to be dedicated to the great other, the great opposed faith. 22


NOTES
1.
The Cogdell monument is mentioned only in passing both in A. S. Salley Jr., "An All-Accomplished Man: John S. Cogdell, Lawyer, Banker, Artist and Musician," Sunday News ( Charleston, S.C.), July 14, 1901, and A. W. Rutledge, "Cogdell and Mills, Charleston Sculptors," Antiques, XLI, March, 1942, 192-93, 205-208. Frazee's tablet to Sarah Haynes is discussed by F. S. Voss in National Portrait Gallery, John Frazee, Sculptor, 1790-1852, Washington, D.C., 1986, 25. The only study of Augur's career remains G. H. Hamilton "Hezekiah Augur: An American Sculptor, 1791-1858," M.A. thesis, Yale University, 1934.
2.
An exception to the lack of scholarly accounts of the sculpture in rural cemeteries can be found in F. A. Scharf , "The Garden Cemetery and American Sculpture: Mount Auburn," Art Quarterly, XIV, Spring 1961, 80-88; the Perkins monument by Greenough is mentioned on 87-88. For Lewis's Hunt monument, see L. Bullard , "Edmonia Lewis," The Revolutiory XX, April 1971.
3.
The most significant discussion of Launitz' career is T. H. Bartlett, "Early Settler Memorials. XI. Robert E. Launitz," American Architect and Building News, XXII, 6, August 1887, 59-61. For Palmer Angel of the Sepulchre, see J. C. Webster, Erastus Dow Palmer, Newark, Del., 1983, 141-43, with a full bibliography on this work. It is also featured in H. P. Phelps, Albany Rural Cemetery, Albany, N.Y., 1893, 125-29. Rinehart's Baltimore cemetery monuments are discussed in W. S. Rusk , William Henry Rinehart, Sculptor, Baltimore, 1939, and M. C. Ross and A. W. Rutledge, A Catalogue of the Work of William Henry Rinehart, Maryland Sculptor, 1825-1874, Baltimore, 1948.
4.
For Hosmer's Falconnet tomb, see C. Carr, Harriet Hosmer, Letters and Memories, New York, 1912, 115-17, 136-37 and Dolly Sherwood, Harriet Hosmer, American Sculptor, 1830-1908, Columbia, Mo. and London, 1991, 142-45. For Pettrich's Pacca tomb, see H. Geller, Franz und Ferdinand Pettrich, Dresden, 1955, 164-66.
5.
For the Crawford monument, see L. Dimmick, "A Catalogue of the Portrait Busts and Ideal Works of Thomas Crawford (1813-1857), American Sculptor in Rome," Ph.D. diss., University of Pittsburgh, 1986, 644. For Rogers' several tomb monuments, see M. F. Rogers Jr. , Randolph Rogers, American Sculptor in Rome, Amherst, Mass., 1971, 115-16, 164, 213, 227.
6.
On the English Cemetery in Florence, see T. André , L'Eglise Evangélique Réformée de Florence depuis son origine jusqu'à nos jours, Florence, 1899,

-147-

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