The Bondman: An Antient Storie

By Philip C. Massinger; Benjamin Townley Spencer et al. | Go to book overview

Preface

SEVERAL of Massinger's plays have been edited in recent years, under the direction of Professor T. M. Parrott, by candidates for the doctorate at Princeton University; and others have been edited or are in preparation at Bryn Mawr College, under the direction of Professor Samuel C. Chew. This edition was presented to the Department of English of the University of Cincinnati as a doctoral dissertation, and, in publishing it, I wish to acknowledge the kindness of Dr. Parrott and Dr. Chew in encouraging me to undertake it.

My work has been done under the guidance of Professor Robert Shafer, who, during the course of my investigations, has given unstintedly of his counsel and help, has supplied me with invaluable references and materials, and at every turn has clarified difficulties and offered constructive suggestions. Much of the material, moreover, in my account of the rise of neo-Stoicism in the Renaissance was derived from his presentation of this movement in a series of lectures to graduate students of the University.

I was also aided by Mr. W. G. Crane, who kindly examined for me editions of The Bondman in the Bodleian and in the British Museum. And I owe a large debt to my wife, whose assistance has been constant in both the gathering and the arrangement of the material, and in the preparation of my manuscript.

To the staff of the Princeton University Library I am indebted for numerous courtesies extended while I was carrying on my researches in Princeton. At the McGill University Library and the Library of Congress, also, pleasant conditions facilitated my work. To the University of Chicago I am indebted for the loan of Massinger editions. The Morgan Library and the Rosenbach Company of New York very graciously permitted me to examine quartos in their possession. And the Graduate School of the University of Cincinnati secured for my use rotographs, from the Huntington Library, the Bodleian, and the British Museum, without which my edition could not have been completed.

B. T. S.

MONTREAL, AUGUST, 1930.

-v-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Bondman: An Antient Storie
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Textual Symbols 75
  • Notes to Text on Page 76 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 77 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 80 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 81 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 82 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 83 *
  • Actvs I. 82
  • Notes to Text on Page 84 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 85 *
  • Actvs I. 84
  • Notes to Text on Page 86 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 87 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 88 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 89 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 90 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 91 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 92 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 93 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 94 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 95 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 96 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 97 *
  • Actvs Ii. 97
  • Actvs Ii. 98
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Actvs Ii. 104
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Actvs Ii. 113
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Actvs Ii. 115
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Actvs Ii. 118
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Notes to Text on Page 125 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 126 *
  • Actvs Ii. 126
  • Actvs Ii. 127
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Actvs Ii. 129
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Notes to Text on Page 132 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 133 *
  • Actvs Ii. 133
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Notes to Text on Page 135 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 136 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 137 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 138 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 139 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 140 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 143 *
  • Actvs V. 143
  • Actvs Ii. 147
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Actvs Ii. 151
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Notes 161
  • Appendix I Influences 257
  • Appendix Ii Printers and Booksellers of the Quartos 260
  • Bibliography 262
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 268

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.