The Bondman: An Antient Storie

By Philip C. Massinger; Benjamin Townley Spencer et al. | Go to book overview
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Leoft. Say we grant this,
For if we ƒhould deny it, you'l not beleeue vs,
What will you inferre vpon it?

Archid. What you'l groane for, 25
I feare, when you come to the teƒt. Old Stories tell vs
There is a Moneth cal'd October; which brings in
Colde weather, there are trenches too, 'tis rumor'd
In which to ƒtand all night to the knees in water,
In Gallants breeds the tooth-ach, there's a ƒport too 30
Nam'd lying Perdieu, (doe you marke me) tis a game,
Which you muƒt learne to play at: now in theƒe ƒeaƒons,
And choyƒe varietie of Exerciƒes,
(Nay I come to you) and faƒts not for Deuotion,
Your rambling hunt-ƒmocke, feeles ƒtrange alterations, 35
And in a Froƒty morning, lookes as if He could with eaƒe creepe in a pottle Pot
Inƒtead of his Miƒtris placket, then, he Curƒes
The time he ƒpent in midnight viƒitations;
And findes what he ƒuperfluouƒly parted with, 40
To be reported good, at length, and well breath'd, But if retriu'd into his backe againe, Enter Diphilus, and Cleora.
Would keepe him warmer then a Scarlet waƒt-coate,
Or an Armour linde with Furre. O welcome, welcome,
You haue cut off my diƒcourƒe, but I well perƒit 45
My lecture in the Campe.

Diphil. Come, we are ƒtay'd for,
The General's a fire for a remoue,
And longs to be in action.

Archid. Tis my wiƒh too,
We muƒt part, nay no teares, my belt Cleora,

I ƒhall melt too, and that were ominous. 50
Millions of bleƒƒings on thee, all that's mine, I giue vp to thy charge, and ƒirra, looke
You, with that care and reuerence obƒerue her
Which you would pay to me, a kiƒƒe, farewell Girle.

Diphil. Peace wayte vpon you, faire one. Exeunt Archid.

Timag. Twere impertinence Diphil. Pifander. 55
To wiƒh you to be carefull of your Honour,

-98-

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