The Bondman: An Antient Storie

By Philip C. Massinger; Benjamin Townley Spencer et al. | Go to book overview

To teach my Horƒe good manners; for this morning,
As I rode to take the ayre, th'untutor'd Iade
Threw me, and kick'd me.

Grac. I thanke him for't.

Afot. What's that?

Grac. I ƒay, Sir, I'le teach him to hold his heeles,
If you will rule your fingers.

Afot. I'le thinke vpon't. 20

Grac. I am bruiƒde to ielly; better be a dogge,
Then ƒlaue to a Foole or Coward.

Afot. Heere's my Mother, Enter Corifca and Zanthia.
Shee is chaƒtiƒing too: How braue we liue!
That haue our ƒlaues to beat, to keepe vs in breath,
When we want exerciƒe.

Corifca. Carelef Careleƒƒe Harlotrie, Striking her. 25
Looke too't, if a Curle fall, or winde, or Sunne,
Take my Complexion off, I will not leaue
One haire vpon thine head.

Grac. Here's a ƒecond ƒhow
Of the Family of pride.

Corifca. Fie on there warres,

I am ƒtaru'd for want of action, not a gameƒter left 30
To keepe a woman play; if this world laƒt A little longer with vs, Ladyes muƒt ƒtudie
Some new found Miƒtery, to coole one another,
Wee ƒhall burne to Cinders elƒe; I haue heard there haue beene
Such Arts in a long vacation; would they were
35
Reueal'd to mee: they haue made my Doctor too Phifitian to the Army, he was vf'de To ƒerue the turne at a pinch: but I am now
Quite vnprouided.

Afot. My Mother in law is ƒure
At her deuotion.

Corifc. There are none but our ƒlaues left, 40
Nor are they to be truƒted; ƒome great women
(Which I could name) in a dearth of Viƒitants,
Rather then be idle, haue beene glad to play
At ƒmall game, but I am fo queaƒie stomack't,

-104-

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The Bondman: An Antient Storie
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Textual Symbols 75
  • Notes to Text on Page 76 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 77 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 80 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 81 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 82 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 83 *
  • Actvs I. 82
  • Notes to Text on Page 84 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 85 *
  • Actvs I. 84
  • Notes to Text on Page 86 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 87 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 88 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 89 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 90 *
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  • Notes to Text on Page 93 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 94 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 95 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 96 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 97 *
  • Actvs Ii. 97
  • Actvs Ii. 98
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Actvs Ii. 104
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Actvs Ii. 113
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Actvs Ii. 115
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Actvs Ii. 118
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Notes to Text on Page 125 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 126 *
  • Actvs Ii. 126
  • Actvs Ii. 127
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Actvs Ii. 129
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Notes to Text on Page 132 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 133 *
  • Actvs Ii. 133
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Notes to Text on Page 135 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 136 *
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  • Notes to Text on Page 139 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 140 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 143 *
  • Actvs V. 143
  • Actvs Ii. 147
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Actvs Ii. 151
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Notes 161
  • Appendix I Influences 257
  • Appendix Ii Printers and Booksellers of the Quartos 260
  • Bibliography 262
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