The Bondman: An Antient Storie

By Philip C. Massinger; Benjamin Townley Spencer et al. | Go to book overview

Of theſe libidinous beaſts, that haue not left
One cruell act vndone, that Barbarous conqueſt,
Yet euer practis'd in a captiue Citie.

He doting on your beauty, and to haue fellowes 20
In his foule ſinne, hath rais'd these mutinous ſlaues, Who haue begun the game by violent Rapes,
Vpon the Wiues and Daughters of their Lords:
And he to quench the fire of his baſe luſt,
By force comes to enioy you: doe not wring Cleora wrings25
Your innocent hands, 'tis bootleſſe; vſe the meanes her hands.
That may preſerue you. 'Tis no crime to breake
A vow, when you are forc'd to it; ſhew your face,
And with the maieſtie of commanding beautie,
Strike dead his looſe affections; if that faile, 30
Giue libertie to your tongue, and vſe entreaties,
There cannot be a breaſt of fleſh, and bloud,
Or heart ſo made of flint, but muſt receiue
Impreſſion from your words; or eies ſo ſterne,
But from the cleere reflection of your teares 35
Muſt melt, and beare them company; will you not Doe theſe good offices to your ſelfe? poore I then,
Can onely weepe your fortune; here he comes.

Piſander. He that aduances Enter Piſander ſpeaking at the doore.

A foot beyond this, comes vpon my ſword. 40
You haue had your wayes, diſturbe not mine.

Timandra. Speake gently,
Her feares may kill her elſe.

Piſander. Now loue inſpire me!
Still ſhall this Canopie of enuious night
Obſcure my Suns of comfort? and thoſe dainties

Of pureſt white and red, which I take in at 45
My greedy eyes, deny'd my famiſh'd ſenſes? The Organs of your hearing yet are open;
And you infringe no vow, though you vouchſafe,
To giue them warrant, to conuey vnto
Your vnderſtanding parts, the ſtory of 50
A tortur'd and diſpairing Louer, whom Cleora, ſhakes.
Not Fortune but aſſection markes your ſlaue.

-115-

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