Select Statutes and Other Documents: Illustrative of the History of the United States, 1861-1898

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SEC. 10. And be it further enacted, That the said commissioners shall from time to time make such temporary rules and regulations, and insert such clauses in said leases as shall be just and proper to secure proper and reasonable employment and support, at wages or upon shares of the crop, of such persons and families as may be residing upon the said parcels or lots of land, which said rules and regulations are declared to be subject to the approval of the President.

SEC. 11. [Commissioners may sell instead of leasing.]

SEC. 12. And be it further enacted, That the proceeds of said leases and sales shall be paid into the Treasury of the United States, one fourth of which shall be paid over to the Governor of said State wherein said lands are situated, or his authorized agent, when such insurrection shall be put down, and the people shall elect a Legislature and State officers who shall take an oath to support the Constitution of the United States, and such fact shall be proclaimed by the President for the purpose of reimbursing the loyal citizens of said State, or such other purpose as said State may direct; and one fourth shall also be paid over to said State as a fund to aid in the colonization or emigration from said State of any free person of African descent who may desire to remove therefrom to Hayti, Liberia, or any other tropical state or colony.

[Sections 13-15 contain minor administrative provisions.]

SEC. 16. And be it further enacted, That this act shall take effect from and after its passage.

APPROVED, June 7, 1862.


No. 20. Abolition of Slavery in the Territories
June 19, 1862

MARCH 24, 1862, Isaac N. Arnold of Illinois introduced in the House a bill "to render freedom national and slavery sectional." Another bill with a similar title was introduced May 1 by Owen Lovejoy of Illinois. The latter bill, with amended title, was reported May 8 as a substitute for the Arnold bill, and

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Select Statutes and Other Documents: Illustrative of the History of the United States, 1861-1898
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