Select Statutes and Other Documents: Illustrative of the History of the United States, 1861-1898

By William MacDonald | Go to book overview

persons who may have participated in the existing rebellion in any State or part thereof, pardon and amnesty, with such exceptions and at such time and on such conditions as he may deem expedient for the public welfare.

SEC. 14. And be it further enacted, That the courts of the United States shall have full power to institute proceedings, make orders and decrees, issue process, and do all other things necessary to carry this act into effect.

APPROVED, July 17, 1862.


No. 25. Act to authorize Payments in Stamps
July 17, 1862

IN a letter of July 14, 1862, to Thaddeus Stevens, Secretary Chase stated that the depreciation of the currency had led to the issue of coins, checks, and tokens, of denominations less than one dollar, by hotels and business houses. A draft of a bill to prohibit such issues and allow the use of stamps as currency was submitted. A bill to carry the recommendation into effect was introduced in the House, July 17, by Samuel Hooper of Massachusetts, and passed by a vote of 62 to 40. The Senate passed the bill the same day without a division.

REFERENCES. -- Text in U.S. Statutes at Large, XII, 592. For the proceedings see the House and Senate Journals, 37th Cong., 2d Sess., and the Cong. Globe. The Senate proceedings were unimportant.

An Act to authorize Payments in Stamps, and to prohibit Circulation of Notes of less Denomination than One Dollar.

Be it enacted . . ., That the Secretary of the Treasury be, and he is hereby directed to furnish to the Assistant Treasurers, and such designated depositaries of the United States as may be by him selected, in such sums as he may deem expedient, the postage and other stamps of the United States, to be exchanged by them, on application, for United States notes; and from and after the first day of August next such stamps shall be receivable in payment of all dues to the United States less than five dollars, and shall be received in exchange for United States notes when presented to any Assistant Treasurer or any desig

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