Select Statutes and Other Documents: Illustrative of the History of the United States, 1861-1898

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excluded from the privilege of holding office by said proposed amendment to the Constitution of the United States, shall be eligible to election as a member of the convention to frame a constitution for any of said rebel States, nor shall any such person vote for members of such convention.

SEC. 6. And be it further enacted, That, until the people of said rebel States shall be by law admitted to representation in the Congress of the United States, any civil governments which may exist therein shall be deemed provisional only, and in all respects subject to the paramount authority of the United States at any time to abolish, modify, control, or supersede the same; and in all elections to any office under such provisional governments all persons shall be entitled to vote, and none others, who are entitled to vote, under the provisions of the fifth section of this act; and no persons shall be eligible to any office under any such provisional governments who would be disqualified from holding office under the provisions of the third article of said constitutional amendment.


No. 57. Tenure of Office Act
March 2, 1867

A BILL "to regulate the tenure of offices" was introduced in the Senate, December 3, 1866, the first day of the session, by George H. Williams of Oregon, and referred to the Joint Select Committee on Retrenchment. On the 10th a substitute amendment was reported by George F. Edmunds of Vermont, who also offered the next day a further amendment, being the last five sections of the act. The amended bill passed the Senate on the 18th by a vote of 29 to 9, 14 not voting. The House, by a vote of 82 to 63, 46 not voting, added an amendment striking out the clause excepting cabinet officers from the operation of the act, the vote on the passage of the amended bill being 111 to 38, 42 not voting. The Senate refused to concur, but the insistence of the House on its principal amendment forced the Senate to agree to the compromise contained in the first section of the act. The report of the conference committee was accepted by the Senate, February 18, by a vote of 22 to 10, and by the House the following day by a vote of 112 to 41, 37 not

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