Select Statutes and Other Documents: Illustrative of the History of the United States, 1861-1898

By William MacDonald | Go to book overview
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Mississippi, and Texas, be forthwith disbanded, and that the further organization, arming, or calling into service of the said militia forces, or any part thereof, is hereby prohibited under any circumstances whatever, until the same shall be authorized by Congress.

APPROVED, March 2, 1867.


No. 60. Abolition of Peonage
March 2, 1867

THE annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs for 1866 called attention to the evils of peonage in New Mexico, and urged Congress "to take the matter in hand and deal with it effectually." January 3, 1867, Sumner offered in the Senate a resolution directing the Committee on the Judiciary "to consider if any further legislation is needed to prevent the enslavement of Indians in New Mexico or any system of peonage there, and especially to prohibit the employment of the army of the United States in the surrender of persons claimed as peons." The resolution was referred to the Committee on Military Affairs. A bill to prohibit peonage, introduced January 26 by Wilson of Massachusetts, was referred to the same committee, which reported the bill on the 28th with an amendment. February 19 a substitute offered by Wilson was agreed to and the bill passed. The bill passed the House March 2.

REFERENCES. -- Text in U.S. Statutes at Large, XIV, 546. For the proceedings see the House and Senate Journals, 39th Cong., 2d Sess., and the Cong. Globe. The proceedings in the House are unimportant.

An Act to abolish and forever prohibit the System of Peonage in the Territory of New Mexico and other Parts of the United States.

Be it enacted . . ., That the holding of any person to service or labor under the system known as peonage is hereby declared to be unlawful, and the same is hereby abolished and forever prohibited in the Territory of New Mexico, or in any other Territory or State of the United States; and all laws, resolutions, orders, regulations, or usages of the Territory of New Mexico, or of any other Territory or State of the United States, which have heretofore established, maintained, or enforced, or by virtue

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