Select Statutes and Other Documents: Illustrative of the History of the United States, 1861-1898

By William MacDonald | Go to book overview

Schenck of Ohio, and recommitted. The bill was reported without amendment on the 7th and passed, the vote being 127 to 32, 28 not voting. A substitute amendment was agreed to by the Senate January 9, 1868, and on the 15th the bill with further amendments passed, the vote being 33 to 4, 16 not voting. The bill received its final form from a conference committee. The bill was presented to the President January 23, and became law February 4 under the ten days rule.

REFERENCES. -- Text in U.S. Statutes at Large, XV, 34. For the proceedings see the House and Senate Journals, 40th Cong., 2d Sess., and the Cong. Globe. The financial situation was discussed at especial length in the Senate. See also Senate Report 4.

AN ACT to suspend further Reduction of the Currency.

Be it enacted . . ., That from and after the passage of this act, the authority of the Secretary of the Treasury to make any reduction of the currency, by retiring or cancelling United States notes, shall be, and is hereby, suspended; but nothing herein contained shall prevent the cancellation and destruction of mutilated United States notes, and the replacing of the same with notes of the same character and amount.


No. 66. Articles of Impeachment March 2-3, 1868

DECEMBER 17, 1866, James M. Ashley of Ohio moved in the House to suspend the rules for the purpose of reporting from the Committee on Territories a resolution for the appointment of a select committee "to inquire whether any acts have been done by any officer of the Government of the United States which, in contemplation of the Constitution, are high crimes or misdemeanors, and whether said acts were designed or calculated to overthrow, subvert, or corrupt the Government of the United States, or any department thereof." The vote was 90 to 49, but two-thirds being necessary, the motion was lost. January 7, 1867, resolutions for the impeachment of President Johnson were offered by Benjamin F. Loan and John R. Kelso of Missouri, and referred, respectively, to the Committee on Reconstruction and the Committee on the Judiciary. On the same day Ashley, as a question of privilege, impeached Johnson of high crimes and misdemeanors, charging him "with a usurpation of power and violation of law" in having corruptly used the powers of ap

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