Select Statutes and Other Documents: Illustrative of the History of the United States, 1861-1898

By William MacDonald | Go to book overview

tation for redemption, at the office of the assistant treasurer of the United States in the city of New York,1 in sums of not less than fifty dollars. And to enable the Secretary of the Treasury to prepare and provide for the redemption in this act authorized or required, he is authorized to use any surplus revenues, from time to time, in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, and to issue, sell, and dispose of, at not less than par, in coin, either of the descriptions of bonds of the United States described in the act of Congress approved July fourteenth, eighteen hundred and seventy, entitled, "An act to authorize the refunding of the national debt," with like qualities, privileges, and exemptions, to the extent necessary to carry this act into full effect, and to use the proceeds thereof for the purposes aforesaid. And all provisions of law inconsistent with the provisions of this act are hereby repealed.

APPROVED, January 14, 1875.


No. 99. Civil Rights Act
March 1, 1875

AN amendment offered by Sumner to the amnesty act of May 22, 1872 [No. 94], forbidding discrimination against negroes in certain public places and elsewhere, was lost by a vote of 29 to 30. A bill of similar purport was called up in the Senate December 11, 1872, and passed over. Another bill passed the Senate April 30, 1873, but failed in the House. A third bill was introduced in the House, December 18, by Butler of Massachusetts, from the Committee on the Judiciary, and January 7, 1874, was recommitted. A fourth civil rights bill passed the Senate May 22, but was not acted on by the House. A substitute for Butler's bill was reported December 16, and February 4, 1875, passed the House with amendments, the vote being 162 to 100, 27 not voting. The bill was reported in the Senate on the 15th without amendment, and passed the same day by a vote of 38 to 26.

REFERENCES.-- Text in U.S Statutes at Large, XVIII, 335-337. For the proceedings see the House and Senate Journals, 43d Cong., 2d Sess., and the Cong. Record. See also Pierce, Sumner, IV, chaps. 57 and 59.

____________________
1
An act of March 3, 1887, chap. 378, added San Francisco.

-303-

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