Select Statutes and Other Documents: Illustrative of the History of the United States, 1861-1898

By William MacDonald | Go to book overview

impairing or otherwise affecting the right of any such Indian to tribal or other property.

SEC. 7. [The Secretary of the Interior to prescribe rules for use of waters for irrigation.]

SEC. 8. That the provision of this act shall not extend to the territory occupied by the Cherokees, Creeks, Choctaws, Chickasaws, Seminoles, and Osage, Miamies and Peorias, and Sacs and Foxes, in the Indian Territory, nor to any of the reservations of the Seneca Nation of New York Indians in the State of New York, nor to that strip of territory in the State of Nebraska adjoining the Sioux Nation on the south added by executive order.

SEC. 9. [Appropriation for surveys.]

SEC. 10. That nothing in this act contained shall be so construed as to affect the right and power of Congress to grant the right of way through any lands granted to an Indian, or a tribe of Indians, for railroads or other highways, or telegraph lines, for the public use, or to condemn such lands to public uses, upon making just compensation.

SEC. 11. That nothing in this act shall be so construed as to prevent the removal of the Southern Ute Indians from their present reservation in Southwestern Colorado to a new reservation by and with the consent of a majority of the adult male members of said tribe.

APPROVED, February 8, 1887.


No. 116. Ownership of Real Estate in the Territories
March 3, 1887

A BILL to restrict the ownership of real estate in the Territories to American citizens was introduced in the House, January 11, 1886, by Lewis E. Payson of Illinois, and referred to the Committee on Public Lands. The bill was not reported until July 31; the same day it passed the House, the vote being 210 to 6, 106 not voting. The Senate passed the bill with amend

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