the night--in which particulars it is not improbable that he had compeers in Fleet Street and the City of London, that fine morning.

'Father,' said Young Jerry, as they walked along: taking care to keep at arm's length and to have the stool well between them: 'what's a Resurrection-Man?'

Mr. Cruncher came to a stop on the pavement before he answered, 'How should I know?'

'I thought you knowed everything, father,' said the artless boy.

'Hem! Well,' returned Mr. Cruncher, going on again, and lifting off his hat to give his spikes free play, 'he 's a tradesman.'

'What 's his goods, father?' asked the brisk Young Jerry.

'His goods,' said Mr. Cruncher, after turning it over in his mind, 'is a branch of Scientific goods.'

'Persons' bodies, ain't it, father?' asked the lively boy.

'I believe it is something of that sort,' said Mr. Cruncher.

'Oh, father, I should so like to be a Resurrection-Man when I'm quite growed up!'

Mr. Cruncher was soothed, but shook his head in a dubious and moral way. 'It depends upon how you dewelop your talents. Be careful to dewelop your talents, and never to say no more than you can help to nobdy, and there 's no telling at the present time what you may not come to be fit for.' As Young Jerry, thus encouraged, went on a few yards in advance, to plant the stool in the shadow of the Bar, Mr. Cruncher added to himself: ' Jerry, you honest tradesman, there 's hopes wot that boy will yet be a blessing to you, and a recompense to you for his mother!'


CHAPTER XV
KNITTING

THERE had been earlier drinking than usual in the wine-shop of Monsieur Defarge. As early as six o'clock in the morning, sallow faces peeping through its barred windows had descried other

-160-

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A Tale of Two Cities
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations x
  • Preface xi
  • Book the First - Recalled to Life 1
  • Chapter I - The Period 1
  • Chapter II - The Mail 4
  • Chapter III - The Night Shadows 9
  • Chapter IV - The Preparation 13
  • Chapter V - The Wine-Shop 25
  • Chapter VI - The Shoemaker 37
  • Book the Second - The Golden Thread *
  • Chapter I - Five Years Later 49
  • Chapter II - A Sight 56
  • Chapter III - A Disappointment 62
  • Chapter IV - Congratulatory 76
  • Chapter V - The Jackal 82
  • Chapter VI - Hundreds of People 88
  • Chapter VII - Monseigneur in Town 100
  • Chapter VIII - Monseigneur in the Country 109
  • Chapter IX - The Gorgon''s Head 114
  • Chapter X - Two Promises 125
  • Chapter XI - ACompanion Picture 134
  • Chapter XII - The Fellow of Delicacy 138
  • Chapter XIII - The Fellow of No Delicacy *
  • Chapter XIV - The Honest Tradesman 150
  • Chapter XV - Knitting 160
  • Chapter XVI - Still Knitting 172
  • Chapter XVII - One Night 183
  • Chapter XVIII - Nine Days 188
  • Chapter XIX - An Opinion 194
  • Chapter XX - A Plea 202
  • Chapter XXI - Echoing Footsteps 206
  • Chapter XXII - The Sea Still Rises 217
  • Chapter XXIII - Fire Rises 222
  • Chapter XXIV - Drawn to the Loadstone Rock 230
  • Book the Third - The Track of a Storm *
  • Chapter I - In Secret 243
  • Chapter II - The Grindstone 255
  • Chapter III - The Shadow 261
  • Chapter IV - Calm in Storm 266
  • Chapter V - The Wood-Sawyer 271
  • Chapter VI - Triumph 272
  • Chapter VII - A Knock at the Door 278
  • Chapter VIII - A Hand at Cards 285
  • Chapter IX - Dusk 303
  • Chapter X - The Substance of the Shadow 316
  • Chapter XI - Dusk 331
  • Chapter XII - Darkness 335
  • Chapter XIII - Fifty-Two 344
  • Chapter XIV - The Knitting Done 356
  • Chapter XV - The Footsteps Die out for Ever 369
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