Individual Training in Our Colleges

By Clarence F. Birdseye | Go to book overview

TABLE OF CONTENTS
PAGE
INTRODUCTION BY ELMER ELLSWORTH BROWN, PH.D., UNITED STATES COMMISSIONER OF EDUCATIONxxvii
FOREWORDxxix
PART I THE ECCLESIASTICAL PERIOD OF OUR COLLEGES
CHAPTER I OUR EARLIER COLLEGES WERE BOARDING SCHOOLS: FLOGGING -- FAGGING -- FRESHMAN SERVITUDE -- COMMONS
The early primacy of Harvard -- Yale's founding3
Study of earlier college conditions necessarily a study of Harvard4
The earlier colleges were schools -- Harvard's founding5
Her location and naming -- Schoolmaster Eaton -- His wife's confession6
Early colleges paternal -- Flogging at Harvard7
A specific example -- Cuffing at Yale -- Fagging8
Freshman servitude rules at Harvard9
Customs read to freshmen -- Freshman servitude at Yale10
Abolishment of freshman servitude11
Hazing foreseen -- Value of freshman servitude -- Its unfortunate sequalæ12
Conditions change -- Commons -- Early rules and regulations13
Prices at the Buttery14
Regulating the boys' expenditures -- Sample menus 15 Commons at Dartmouth16
CHAPTER II OUR EARLIER COLLEGES WERE BOARDING SCHOOLS: THEIR LAWS AND THEIR INDIVIDUAL TRAINING
Early laws reflected severity of times18
Strict regulation of boys' lives -- Harvard's earliest laws -- Entrance requirements -- Christ at the bottom -- Two Scripture readings daily -- Profaning God's name, etc. -- Redeeming the time19

-vii-

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