Individual Training in Our Colleges

By Clarence F. Birdseye | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIII
OUR EDUCATIONAL RENAISSANCE.

As truly as there was a Cathedral Age when those great sermons in stone rose on every side, so the present is the Age of University Building; more than that it is also the Age of Growth of Education of all kinds.

Age of University Building and Growth of Education.

Never before has the world witnessed such a growth in educational matters. It is not a revival, but a renaissance, a new birth, and along entirely new lines. It extends not to the rich or middle classes alone. Education not only offers herself to the poor, but she is determined that her offer shall be availed of. She not only punishes the employer of child labor, but as well the parent who breaks the school laws. She has not only a compulsory school law but a truant law. She not only furnishes free school- houses, but also free books, and even free transportation and meals in some cases.

The bickerings, heart-burnings, graft, professional jealousies and political strifes during the Cathedral Age, of which there were many, have been lost in the intervening centuries and are now forgotten. Only the beautiful temples themselves remain to inspire us and to serve their own noble purposes from day to day. We are told there can never be another Cathedral Age, for never again can inspiration be drawn, as before, from the great crusades; and that in the future we must look only for reproductions or sporadic examples of the art which gave to Europe her most beautiful architecture.

Errors will be forgotten.

So, in years to come, the world will look back upon the present as our great Age of University Building. Mistakes, jealousies and wrong steps have been few considering the immensity of the movement and the rapidity with which it has progressed; but these will soon be corrected and then forgotten in the vastness and permanence of the results. Whether or not this movement has

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