Individual Training in Our Colleges

By Clarence F. Birdseye | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXII PRESENT COLLEGE CONDITIONS AS TO DISTRIBUTION, PROPERTY, SIZE, INCOME AND PUBLIC OR PRIVATE OWNERSHIP

THE report of the U. S. Commissioner of Education for 1906 recognizes 622 universities, colleges, technical schools, including over 100 class B colleges for women only (where there are:, comparatively few students taking the ordinary college course), and 264 normal schools.

Number of institutions.

Until quite recent years Western institutions of higher learning were few and small. Therefore our older alumni are principally graduates of New England and the Middle states colleges, and do not realize that undergraduate conditions have radically; changed, that we must study them as they are, and that we must not generalize from those which surrounded us in the small Eastern colleges of thirty to fifty years ago, erroneously assuming that they govern the present huge colleges, East and West.

Supremacy no longer at East.

A list of the earlier colleges of the Eastern and Middle states, now called the North Atlantic Division, with their times of starting and their enrollment at the periods named, is given on the next page.

Table of faculties and students, 1820-1850.

Thus in 1850 there were only 3016 students in 19 colleges of the Northern Atlantic Division, taught by 191 professors and 45 tutors, of whom 20 tutors were in Harvard and Yale. The only institutions having more than 150 pupils on their rolls, were Yale 386 undergraduates, Harvard 297, Union 266, Princeton 236, Dartmouth 196, Columbia 179, and Amherst 176. The other twelve colleges had 1280 undergraduates, or an average of 107. In other words one hundred per cent of our college students were then in institutions of less than 400 enrollment; eighty-seven per cent of less than 300; sixty per cent of less than 200; and forty- two per cent of less than 150.

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