Individual Training in Our Colleges

By Clarence F. Birdseye | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXVII
THE GREEK-LETTER FRATERNITIES: THEIR ORIGIN AND HISTORY

WHENEVER bodies of young men have been gathered together, more or less permanently, they have tended to separate into groups based upon kindred tastes, aims, interests or other causes. This was so even in the mediæval universities, where the students separated into the "nations," as they were called, drawn together by race or clan ties. In German universities it takes the form of various associations; in Oxford and Cambridge, of the fellowship of the Common Room. In this country it early developed through various kinds of societies, the most permanent of which have been the college secret societies or fraternities. The first one of these bearing a Greek-letter name was founded at the college of William and Mary at Williamsburg, Va., in 1776 and called Phi Beta Kappa. It was secret in its nature, but formed for social and literary purposes, and held regular and frequent meetings. In December, 1779, it authorized chapters at Yale and Harvard. The next year the parent chapter closed temporarily because of the fighting which then prevailed in the vicinity of Williamsburg.

Formation of first fraternity.

The chapter at Yale was actually established on November 13, 1780, and took the name of Alpha of Connecticut. Its membership was confined to the two upper classes, and thus probably founded the junior societies of Yale. The Harvard Alpha was started September 5, 1781, and the Dartmouth Alpha in 1787. After the formation of Phi Beta Kappa, the literary or debating societies, so called, were founded in the various colleges. They were directly encouraged by the faculties, the students joined them as a matter of course and their work was mainly educational. Their debates, reading and discussion of papers, and other literary exercises were part of the training then so important in public speaking and English composition. But their chief interest was in

-208-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Individual Training in Our Colleges
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 442

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.