Individual Training in Our Colleges

By Clarence F. Birdseye | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXX
FROM WHAT STANDPOINT SHOULD WE STUDY THE STUDENT'S PROBLEMS? -- THE ELEMENTS OF THOSE PRO BLEMS

EVIDENTLY we must study from the standpoint of the student himself, as an individual. But that is composite -- covering each individual's past, present and future, and must be considered in its relations to his parents; his preparatory school; his athletics; his social and other culture and polish; his temptations; his college and fraternity atmosphere; his pleasures; the strength of his moral character; his moral training (not necessarily religious); his mental training; his physique; his acquisition of general knowledge, and later of professional knowledge; his business habits; his culture habits; his ability to attend to little things but to rise to important crises; to earn a competence, and hence to support a family as early as may be; his power to overcome adversity and difficulties, yet to keep his eyes fixed on the large things in life; his capacity for being self-centered and able to investigate a problem, and then to form and act upon his own opinion. In other words, these questions relate to the moral, mental and physical qualities of each individual student that shall make him a cultured, upright and successful breadwinner, problem solver and citizen.

Composite.

The student's standpoint.

These are some of the important elements of the student's standpoint from which we should judge and weigh his college course as an individual, and not as a class or a group. When we have mastered these we may look around for those of the faculty and alumni, and if we find any points not already covered, let us attend to them also. If this be even a fair description of the proper standpoint from which to view our student's problem, how ridiculous and futile to expect the faculty acting alone to work out the solution. It will require the best and combined efforts of student, faculty,

Faculty alone cannot solve problem.

-244-

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