Individual Training in Our Colleges

By Clarence F. Birdseye | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXXV
WHEN SHOULD THE STUDENT DETERMINE UPON HIS FUTURE CALLING?

THE suggestion is constantly made that a young man is not capable of determining as to his future calling before he has finished his college course, but there is no more harmful or unwarranted assumption and tradition than this.

Should Choose when entering college.

It has already been shown very clearly that in the earlier days boys were through college and ready to enter their professions at fifteen, sixteen or seventeen, and that they were then much less mature and worldly-wise than the average high school graduate of to-day. Certainly a youth of eighteen or twenty should now be able to determine at least the nature of the profession or business which he proposes to follow and to shape his college course accordingly. This may require him to consult with friends and thoroughly canvass the whole subject; which will be a decided advantage, for it will compel him to look ahead and take a more mature view of his future. A student can understand that he will not have much opportunity for athletics after he leaves college. He should also be made to feel that there are certain preliminary courses and training which must be pursued in college or never; that if this chance be lost, it will probably never come again; and that thus his future value in dollars and cents as a problem solver will be correspondingly and permanently diminished. It is not difficult to press this thought home on young men in whom you are interested and who have confidence in you. Appreciation of it by the student will make his college course a period of fine and broad preliminary training for his profession or business, along lines of general culture, which he will not find time to take up in his professional school or possibly in after life. There are many side lights upon pro-

Student is Old enough.

Should understand object of course.

-298-

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