Individual Training in Our Colleges

By Clarence F. Birdseye | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXXVII
A WEAK SPOT IN THE FRATERNITY ORGANIZATION -- THE GENERAL SECRETARY -- COÖPERATION AMONG FRATERNITIES

HAVING become great institutions, with an undergraduate and graduate membership and material wealth exceeding those of most of our colleges in their recent past, our fraternities have not realized that their duties and interests require thorough reorganization of their work upon a corresponding scale, and the introduction of the best business methods. Moreover their moral responsibilities for the well-being and personal life of their undergraduate members are such that they are bound to do everything in their power to insure that each individual undergraduate gets, as nearly as possible, one hundred per cent of what his college course holds for him. Many of the best business and legal organizers of the country are fraternity members, but they certainly have not awakened to the situation, or they would long ago have given some of their splendid talents to developing more systematically their own brotherhoods. We have always felt that the fraternity was emphatically a brotherhood, and have therefore reacted against any paid officers, feeling naturally that every service should be rendered for love alone. This was once true; but silently yet surely our fraternities have grown into great educational powers, and we must frankly recognize and accept the changed circumstances, and the calls upon us, and alter our systems accordingly.

Growth demands modern methods.

The fraternities are governed by councils, in one form or another, composed of several enthusiastic and distinguished graduates, who gratuitously give such time as they can to fraternity affairs. One well-known council member has acted as such for thirty years.

The present form of central organization is weak in that there

-320-

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