Individual Training in Our Colleges

By Clarence F. Birdseye | Go to book overview

INDEX
Absences, see Cuts; Vacations.
Academies in early times, 67, 114, 118.
Accuracy required in modern conditions, 231, 232, 294; not emphasized at college, 245, 294; student should cultivate, 346.
Addington, Isaac, draws Yale charter, 3.
Admonition of President Dunster, 41; at college chapel, 23, 24.
Advertising college by athletics, 144- 147, 159, 160.
Age of students in earlier colleges, 30- 33; were mere children, 29-33; entrance, increased, 33, 179, 180; importance of this, 33; of secondary school students, 124-129.
Age of university building, 95-98.
Age of growth of education, 95-98.
Algebra when made college entrance requirement, 122.
Alma mater, how she has changed, 310- 318. See also College; Mother.
Alpha Delta Phi formed at Hamilton, 210.
Alumni, harmful influences in athletics, 146-166; encourage betting and gambling, 149, 150; false view of college conditions, 256; responsible for spoiling students, 248, 249; and for cheap sports, 371; position in college family and community lives, 205-207; must consider college atmosphere, 235; must work for cultured problem solvers, 235; should study and help solve student problem, 244- 249; are needed to counsel undergraduates, 105, 246, 247; responsibility and duties of, 278-290; present problems only slightly pedagogical, 278; who should care for students' home life, 278; unreasonable demands upon faculty, 278, 279; student problem complex, 278, 279; remedy must be equally complete, 279; assistance of, needed in solving problems, 280; especially with moral evils, 280; on boards of trustees, 280; students must furnish facts to, 280, 281; must treat students like men, 281; must remove sources of evil, 282; must recognize changed conditions, 282, 283; how a president cleaned up bad conditions, 283, 284; our business and professional, must clear up college atmosphere, 284, 285; enlighten students on their future work, 285, 299-303; must restore premium on good work, 285; increase right output, 285; teach better factory practice, 286; power of, in this work, 286; present college results poor, 287; some agencies of, at work, 287, 288; power of, in fraternities, 288; how they should aid, 288, 289; faculty should welcome aid of, 289; especially in smaller colleges, 289; and authorities, not students, responsible, 290.
afterword to, 369-371; shirking your debts, 369, 370; alma mater needs your help, 370; her course now largely for business, 370; help her to introduce business methods, 370; and clean up college atmosphere and homes, 370; improve athletics, 370, 371; avoid setting bad personal examples, 371; your fatal failures, 371.
See also College; Fraternity.
Ames' Medulla and Cases of Conscience, 4, 36, 359, 386, 387.
Amherst College, started as a school, 5; formed from Williams College, 44; charter to, 44, 45; early discipline at, 19; bowling and billiards for

-409-

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