Biomusicology: Neurophysiological, Neuropsychological, and Evolutionary Perspectives on the Origins and Purposes of Music

By Nils L. Wallin | Go to book overview

auditory cortex, presented by Reale and Imig in 1980. The description of the structure and function of the lower and upper auditory brain stem has been adjusted to agree with the modern view as presented by Lindsay Aitkin in his important monograph, The Auditory Midbrain.3


AN INTRODLICTORY EPITOME

First, a brief overall description of the main stations between the cochlea of the inner ear and the auditory projection areas of the cortex. We follow the pathways drawn in Figure 1.

There is general agreement today that the initial, still mechanical, frequency analysis of a pure or complex tone is completed at the level of the basilar membrane; the complex tone is resolved in its components in a process equivalent to a Fourier analysis, the result of which is communicated to the auditory relays of the brain. The change to an electric-chemical analysis occurs in the sensory cells of the membrane, where the information is transmitted to the nerve fibers leading from the peripheral part of the system into the central nervous system (CNS). A remarkable observation is that the main nervous pathways of a species develop at their embryological level only under a very weak external influence. The process of maturing of the visual as well as the auditory centers precedes that of the peripheral receptors.4 We will return to this observation, which is vital to the understanding of the conditions for learning, when discussing pitch perception.

The first station in the CNS after the auditory nerve is the nuclei cochlearis (CN) in the hindbrain. The projection of the CN is tonotopically organized. These cell groups possess various kinds of neurons situated in different parts of the nuclei. Some respond only, or preferably, to low and middle frequencies, others to high frequencies; some neurones specialize in reproducing repetitive

____________________
3
Lindsay Aitkin, The Auditory Midbrain: Structure and Function in the Central Auditory Pathway ( 1985).
4
R. Marty and J. Scherrer, in Progress in Brain Research 4, eds. D. Purpura and J. Schadé ( 1969), 225; J.-P. Changeux and A. Danchin, in L'unité de l'homme 2: le cerveau humain, eds. E. Morin and M. Piattelli-Palmarini ( 1974), 58.

-150-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Biomusicology: Neurophysiological, Neuropsychological, and Evolutionary Perspectives on the Origins and Purposes of Music
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 586

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.