New Architecture and City Planning: A Symposium

By Paul Zucker | Go to book overview

THE PRIVATE HOUSE

By KENNETH REID

It would be pleasant to predict, for after the war, a probable general change from traditional to contemporary thinking in the design of private houses. I would like to believe that the cessation of private construction over a period of several years may have completely weakened our sentimental attachment to habits of the past, and that the breathing spell has enabled both architects and clients to take stock of themselves and to transform their collaborative attitudes towards domestic design. Unfortunately, I cannot quite convince myself that this is true. It seems more likely that the war has punctuated the evolution of design with merely a comma--not a period--and that the general average of taste and architectural understanding has not changed radically or suddenly but will pick up pretty much where it left off.

The war has, however, admittedly ploughed its tracks deep into the lives of this generation. Our roots in the past have been loosened--more than most of us realize or are ready to admit. Millions of us have been moved to new environments--have become acquainted with other ways of life. Those who have traveled to the battle fronts or to foreign stations in Africa, Europe, India, China, Australia, Alaska, Greenland, and South America, or who have even moved about through their own country, are seeing at first- hand how other people than their own familiar neighbors have

-45-

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