Behaviorism, Neobehaviorism, and Cognitivism in Learning Theory: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives

By Abram Amsel | Go to book overview

JOHN M. MacEACHRAN MEMORIAL LECTURE SERIES

The Department of Psychology at the University of Alberta inaugurated the MacEachran Memorial Lecture Series in 1975 in honor of the late Professor John M. MacEachran. Professor MacEachran was born in Ontario in 1877 and received a Ph.D. in Philosophy from Queen's University in 1905. In 1906 he left for Germany to begin more formal study in psychology, first spending just less than a year in Berlin with Stumpf, and then moving to Leipzig, where he completed a second Ph.D. in 1908 with Wundt as his supervisor. During this period he also spent time in Paris studying under Durkheim and Henri Bergson. With these impressive qualifications the University of Alberta was particularly fortunate in attracting him to its faculty in 1909.

Professor MacEachran's impact has been significant at the university, provincial, and national levels. At the University of Alberta he offered the first courses in psychology and subsequently served as Head of the Department of Philosophy and Psychology and Provost of the University until his retirement in 1945. It was largely owing to his activities and example that several areas of academic study were established on a firm and enduring basis. In addition to playing a major role in establishing the Faculties of Medicine, Education and Law in this Province, Professor MacEachran was also instrumental in the formative stages of the Mental Health Movement in Alberta. At a national level, he was one of the founders of the Canadian Psychological Association and also became its first Honorary President in 1939. John M. MacEachran was indeed one of the pioneers in the development of psychology in Canada.

Perhaps the most significant aspect of the MacEachran Memorial Lecture Series has been the continuing agreement that the Department of Psychology at the University of Alberta has with Lawrence Erlbaum. Associates, Publishers, Inc., for the publication of each lecture series. The following is a list of the Invited Speakers and the titles of their published lectures:

1975 Frank A. Geldard ( Princeton University)
"Sensory Saltation: Metastability in the Perceptual World"
1976 Benton J. Underwood ( Northwestern University)
"Temporal Codes for Memories: Issues and Problems"
1977 David Elkind ( Rochester University)
"The Child's Reality: Three Developmental Themes"

-ii-

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Behaviorism, Neobehaviorism, and Cognitivism in Learning Theory: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • John M. Maceachran Memorial Lecture Series ii
  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1: Setting the Stage 1
  • 2 - Issues Surrounding the Old and the New Learning Theory 31
  • 3 - Representational and Non-Representational Levels of Functioning: A Possible Conciliation 61
  • References 89
  • Author Index 99
  • Subject Index 103
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