The Plays of David Garrick: A Complete Collection of the Social Satires, French Adaptations, Pantomimes, Christmas and Musical Plays, Preludes, Interludes, and Burlesques - Vol. 1

By Harry William Pedicord; Fredrick Louis Bergmann et al. | Go to book overview

Epilogue

By the same Hand as the Prologue.
Spoke by Mrs. PRITCHARD.

Good folks, I'm come at my young lady's bidding
To say, you all are welcome to her wedding.
Th' exchange she made, what mortal here can blame?
Show me the maid that would not do the same.
For sure the greatest monster ever seen
Is doting sixty coupled to sixteen!
When wintry age had almost caught the fair,
Youth clad in sunshine snatched her from despair.
Like a new Semele the virgin lay,

And clasped her lover in the blaze of day.10
Thus may each maid, the toils almost entrapped-in,
Change old Sir Simon for the brisk young Captain.

I love these men of arms, they know their trade;
Let dastards sue, these sons of fire invade.
They cannot bear around the bait to nibble,
Like pretty, powdered, patient Mr. Fribble.
To dangers bred, and skilful in command,
They storm the strongest fortress sword in hand.
Nights without sleep, and floods of tears when waking,

Showed poor Miss Biddy was in piteous taking.20
She's now quite well; for maids in that condition
Find the young lover is the best physician;
And without helps of art or boast of knowledge,
They cure more women, faith, than all the college.

But to the point. I come with low petition,
For, faith, poor Bayes is in a sad condition.
*The huge tall hangman stands to give the blow,
And only waits your pleasures--Ay or No.

____________________
*
Alluding to Bayes's Prologue in the Rehearsal.

-103-

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