The Plays of David Garrick: A Complete Collection of the Social Satires, French Adaptations, Pantomimes, Christmas and Musical Plays, Preludes, Interludes, and Burlesques - Vol. 1

By Harry William Pedicord; Fredrick Louis Bergmann et al. | Go to book overview

the tops, you see, will take off to wear in a morning, or in an undress. How d'ye like them? (Shows jewels.)

FANNY. Very much, I assure you. Bless me, sister, you have a prodigious quantity of jewels. You'll be the very queen of diamonds.

MISS STERLING. Ha, ha, ha! Very well, my dear, I shall be as fine as a little queen indeed. I have a bouquet to come home tomorrow made up of diamonds and rubies and emeralds and topazes and amethysts, jewels of all colors--green, red, blue, yellow, intermixt --the prettiest thing you ever saw in your life! The jeweler says

I shall set out with as many diamonds as anybody in town except40
Lady Brilliant and Polly What-d'ye-call-it, Lord Squander's kept mistress.

FANNY. But what are your wedding clothes, sister?

MISS STERLING. Oh, white and silver, to be sure, you know. I bought them at Sir Joseph Lutestring's, and sat above an hour in the parlor behind the shop consulting Lady Lutestring about gold and silver stuffs on purpose to mortify her.

FANNY. Fie, sister, how could you be so abominably provoking?

MISS STERLING. Oh, I have no patience with the pride of your city-

knights' ladies. Did you never observe the airs of Lady Lutestring50
drest in the richest brocade out of her husband's shop, playing crown whist at Haberdasher's Hall? While the civil smirking Sir Joseph, with a snug wig trimmed round his broad face as close as a new-cut yew hedge, and his shoes so black that they shine again, stands all day in his shop, fastened to his counter like a bad shilling?

FANNY. Indeed, indeed, sister, this is too much. If you talk at this rate, you will be absolutely a bye-word in the city. You must never venture on the inside of Temple Bar again.

MISS STERLING. Never do I desire it--never, my dear Fanny, I promise60
you. Oh, how I long to be transported to the dear regions of Grosvenor Square, far, far from the dull districts of Aldersgate, Cheap, Candlewick, and Farringdon Without and Within! My heart goes pit-a-pat at the very idea of being introduced at court-- gilt chariot!--pyebald horses!--laced liveries!--and then the whispets buzzing round the circle, "Who is that young lady? Who is she?"--" LadyMelvil, ma'am."LadyMelvil! My ears tingle at the sound. And then at dinner, instead of my father perpetually asking, "Any news upon 'Change?" to cry, "Well, Sir John, any
thing new from Arthur's?"--or to say to some other woman of70
quality, "Was your Ladyship at the Dutchess of Rubber's last

____________________
58. bye-word] O1, O2, O3, O4, O5, O6, O7, O8, O9, W1, W2, C; By-word D1, D2.

-268-

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The Plays of David Garrick: A Complete Collection of the Social Satires, French Adaptations, Pantomimes, Christmas and Musical Plays, Preludes, Interludes, and Burlesques - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xix
  • Introduction xxi
  • Lethe; Or, Esop in the Shades - A Dramatic Satire 1740 1
  • Epilogue 33
  • The Lying Valet 1741 35
  • Dramatis Personae 37
  • Scene 1. Gayless' Lodgings. Enter Gayless and Sharp. 37
  • Scene [ii]. Melissa's Lodgings. Enter Melissa and Kitty. 45
  • Scene [ii]. Melissa's Lodgings. Enter Melissa and Kitty. 45
  • Scene [ii]. Melissa's Lodgings. Enter Melissa and Kitty. 51
  • Epilogue 67
  • Miss in Her Teens: Or, the Medley of Lovers - A Farce 1747 69
  • Advertisement 71
  • Prologue 72
  • Dramatis Personae 74
  • Act I. Scene I. 74
  • Scene [ii.] Changes to A Chamber. 83
  • Act Ii. Scene I. 83
  • Epilogue 103
  • Lilliput 1756 - A Dramatic Entertainment 105
  • Advertisement 107
  • Prologue 110
  • Dramatis Personae 112
  • Epilogue 130
  • The Male-Coquette; Or, Seventeen-Hundred Fifty-Seven 1757 133
  • Advertisement 135
  • Prologue 136
  • Dramatis Personae 138
  • Act I. [scene I.] [a Hall in Sophia's House.] 138
  • [scene Ii.] 146
  • Act Ii. [scene I.] 146
  • Act Ii. [scene I.] 155
  • Act Ii. [scene I.] 162
  • The Guardian A Comedy 1759 169
  • Advertisement 171
  • Dramatis Personae 172
  • Act I. Scene I. A Hall in Mr. Heartly's House. 172
  • Act II 173
  • Act II 188
  • Harlequin's Invasion; Or, A Christmas Gambol 1759 199
  • Dramatis Personae 201
  • Act I 201
  • Scene Ii. Plain Chamber 205
  • Scene Ii. Plain Chamber 205
  • Scene Ii. Plain Chamber 213
  • Scene Ii. Plain Chamber 216
  • Scene Ii. Plain Chamber 221
  • The Enchanter; Or, Love and Magic A Musical Drama 1760 227
  • Advertisement 229
  • Persons 230
  • Act I. Scene I. 231
  • Scene Ii. Plain Chamber 233
  • Scene Ii. Plain Chamber 233
  • Scene Ii. Plain Chamber 234
  • Scene Ii. Plain Chamber 235
  • Scene Ii. Plain Chamber 235
  • Scene Ii. Plain Chamber 235
  • Scene Ii. Plain Chamber 238
  • Scene Ii. Plain Chamber 240
  • Scene Ii. Plain Chamber 240
  • The Farmer's Return from London . - An Interlude 1762 243
  • Advertisement 245
  • Persons of the Interlude 246
  • The Clandestine Marriage - Acomedy 1766 253
  • Advertisement 255
  • Prologue 256
  • Dramatist Personae 258
  • Act I. [scene I.] 258
  • Scene Ii. Plain Chamber 268
  • Act Ii. [scene I.] 268
  • [scene Ii.] 281
  • [scene Ii.] 281
  • [scene Ii.] 291
  • [scene Ii.] 298
  • Act Iv. Scene I. 298
  • [scene Ii.] 306
  • [scene Ii.] 306
  • [scene Ii.] 317
  • [scene Ii.] 320
  • Epilogue 332
  • Neck or Nothing A Farce 1766 337
  • Advertisement 339
  • Dramatis Personae 340
  • Act I. [scene I.] 340
  • Scene II 347
  • Scene II 355
  • Scene II 363
  • Scene II 364
  • List of References 373
  • Commentary and Notes 377
  • Index to Commentary 431
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