The Italian Presence in American Art, 1760-1860

By Irma B. Jaffe | Go to book overview

List of Color Plates
1. Benjamin West, Angelica and Medoro
2. Rembrandt Peale, Cascatelles of Tivoli
3. Jasper F. Cropsey, Evening at Paestum
4. Follower of Botticelli, Madonna and Child
5. Edwin White, Leonardo da Vinci and His Pupils
6. Washington Allston, Moonlit Landscape
7. Richard Earlom after Claude Lorrain drawing, Landscape with the Port of Santa Marinella, in the Liber Veritatis
8. Washington Allston, Italian Landscape, detail
9. J. M. W Turner, Mildmay Seapiece
10. Samuel F. B. Morse, The Muse: Susan Walker Morse
11. Samuel F. B. Morse, The Gallery of the Louvre
12. Samuel F. B. Morse, Chapel with the Virgin at Subiaco
13. Thomas Cole, View on the Arno
14. Conservators working on canopy under the dome of the U. S. Capitol, 1987
15. Constantino Brumidi, Calling of Putnam from the Plow to the Revolution
16. Constantino Brumidi, The Apotheosis of George Washington
17. Thomas U. Walter, Section through Dome of U. S. Capitol
18. Constantino Brumidi, The Apotheosis of George Washington, detail
19. Constantino Brumidi, The Apotheosis of George Washington, detail
20. Constantino Brumidi, The Apotheosis of George Washington, central section
21. Constantino Brumidi, The Apotheosis of George Washington, detail
22. Elihu Vedder, Cows and Geese
23. Odoardo Borrani, Il Mugnone
24. Elihu Vedder, Three Monks Walking in a Garden at Fiesole
25. Silvestro Lega, Il Bindolo
26. Elihu Vedder, San Gimigniano
27. Raffaello Semesi, Vecchio Muro diFirenze-- Torre del Mascherino
28. Vincenzo Cabianca, Liguria
29. Elihu Vedder, The Fable of the Miller, His Son and His Donkey, Number One
30. Odoardo Borrani, Antica Porta a Ognissanti
31. Elihu Vedder, The Death of Abel
32. Elihu Vedder, The Plague in Florence
33. Thomas Crawford, Monument to Amos Binney
34. Mount Vernon, view, 1874
35. Mount Vernon, Venetian Windows, north side, 1773-1779
36. Mount Vernon, Vangham Plan, 1787

-xvii-

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