The Italian Presence in American Art, 1760-1860

By Irma B. Jaffe | Go to book overview
Save to active project

to the eminent New York-New Jersey Morrises, best remembered for producing two statesmen, his grand-uncles Lewis, who signed the Declaration of Independence, and Gouverneur. For biographies of Davis' patron, a prominent agriculturist and a promoter of navigation on the Harlem River, see his obituary in The New York Times, September 20, 1900, 2, and J. Scharf et al., History of Westchester County, NY I, Philadelphia, 1886, 828-30. Our Plate 136 comes from ibid., plate facing 830. The National Union Catalogue lists four publications by Morris (e.g., two of his catalogues of the highly regarded animals that he bred).

The Commission. I have by no means exhausted the sources of information on Davis' house itself For basic documentation I have relied on Davis' Daybook, Vol. I ( New York Public Library, Rare Books and Manuscripts Division), and his Journal (NNMM, Davis Collection, Vol. I, 92). The entries in the Daybook show that, between December 28, 1846, and January 1, 1847, Davis went to Fordham with Morris, began planning additions for Morris' house according to both a symmetrical format and the final scheme, and drew. an Italianate plan and elevation for the commission, all for a charge of $8.00. He did the lion's share of his work on Morris' house in January (January 2, 4, 8-19), and this included meeting with Mr. and Mrs. Morris (January 21). As of March 10, when he worked on details for the house, his charges had reached $100 ( Daybook I, 341; cp. Journal, 92, with a list of the drawings). In August he visited the house twice (informally on August 15 and professionally on August 30). In his last major undertaking in the remodeling, he designed three kinds of chimneypieces on September 1-2, 1847 ( Journal, 92; Daybook I, 351). The remodeling cannot have reached completion before 1848. The house survived into the twentieth century; see R. Comfort et al., comps., History of Bronx Borough, New York, 1906, 75, 101. See also Journal, 209, on further Davis designs ( 1863-1864) for "Mount Fordham," for a coachhouse and stable and for a gatehouse.

The Drawings. Davis' "Mount Fordham" drawings share in a central problem with his papers, the existence of multiple variant drawings made of a given design at different dates. All the following drawings are in NNMM, Davis Collection. For drawings related to "Mount Fordham" as executed, see Vol. VII, 136-37v, and 140 attached to 150; for two studies on the symmetrically fronted alternative that Davis labeled as his first thoughts, see 138v-39. For Davis' later undated drawings of a never-executed Gallicized version with French roofs, see Vol. VI, 147r-v, as well as Vol. II, 104, with an elevation of the Italianate version that Davis amended, adding French roofs over the low roofs that he had originally drawn. (Among other material, the verso of this last bears, in the upper left-hand corner, the pencil inscription "Norton's. Newhaven," in, I believe, Davis' hand. It remains a question why Davis referred to Henry Austin's closely related Norton House, on which see above.) Other Davis drawings for Morris or associated with him exist. Some of them, such as that for a circular gate lodge in the Box "Davis Buildings H-M," and those in Vol. VII, 75-76, evidently from a series of cottage designs for sloping terrain, hold considerable interest, but reconstructing the general story of Morris' patronage lies much beyond the scope of this essay.

-230-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Italian Presence in American Art, 1760-1860
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 252

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.