Labour and Socialism: A History of the British Labour Movement, 1867-1974

By James Hinton | Go to book overview

but the minority, stiffened by the adamantine refusal of the General Council to accept cuts in unemployment benefit, was too large to be disregarded. 'The General Council are pigs', remarked Sidney Webb, who favoured the cuts. Arthur Henderson, on the other hand, concluded that only the fall of the Government could preserve the unity of the labour movement.

On August 23 the Cabinet resigned, expecting a Liberal-Conservative coalition to replace them. To the astonishment of most Labour ministers,, Ramsay MacDonald emerged next day as Prime Minister in a National Government, including Conservatives, Liberals and two other leading Labour figures, Philip Snowden and Jimmy Thomas. By implementing the cuts that Labour had rejected, the new Government temporarily stabilised the situation. But in September, the Government was finally forced off the Gold Standard which MacDonald had abandoned his party to preserve. In October, under Tory pressure, the 'emergency' National Government rendered itself permanent by calling a general election in which Labour was reduced to a mere fifty-two seats, less than it had held since before 1914. Its proportion of the vote, however, had only fallen from 37 to 30 per cent. It was the lack of Liberal-Conservative competition that decimated the party's representation in Parliament.


Notes
1
R. K. Middlemass, The Clydesiders, London 1965, p. 141.
2
B. B. Gilbert, British Social Policy, 1914-1939, London 1970, p. 75.
3
T. Bell, A Short History of the British Communist Party, London 1937, p. 100.
4
J.T. Murphy, speech at Communist International 1922. Quoted in J. Hinton and R. Hyman, Trade Unions and Revolution: The Industrial Politics of the Early British Communist Party, London 1975, p. 14.
5
J. Klugmann, History of the Communist Party of Great Britain, vol. 2, London 1969, p. 162.
6
Walter Citrine, "'The Next Step in Industrial Relations'", 1927. Reprinted in W. Milne Bailey, Trade Union Documents, London 1929, p. 434.
7
R. H. Tawney, "'The Choice Before the Labour Party'", 1934. Quoted in M. Foot, Aneurin Bevan, London 1966, p. 88.

-147-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Labour and Socialism: A History of the British Labour Movement, 1867-1974
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Abbreviations vi
  • Introduction vii
  • 1 1
  • Notes 23
  • 2 - Society, Politics and the Labour Movement, 1875-1914 24
  • 3 - Socialism and the New Unionism, 1884-95 40
  • Notes 63
  • 4 - The Labour Alliance, 1895-1914 64
  • Notes 82
  • 5 - The Labour Unrest, 1910-14 83
  • Notes 95
  • 6 - The Impact of War, 1914-21 96
  • Notes 117
  • 7: Working-Class Organisation Between the Wars 119
  • 8 - Labour Government and General Strike, 1924-31 131
  • Notes 147
  • 9 - The Thirties 148
  • Notes 160
  • 10 - Labour and the Nation, 1939-51 161
  • Notes 178
  • Notes 200
  • Further Reading 201
  • Index 207
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 216

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.