VI
HIRED SLAVE AND TOWN SLAVE

THE PLANTATION PATTERN which we have been considering in the preceding chapters had several variations. These were, however, of comparatively minor significance in the Alabama of the period. They might have become much more important if the War Between the States had not brought the institution of slavery to an abrupt end.

Some slaves lived, not on broad plantations, but in towns, serving in households, in shops, and even in factories. Some masters, especially in times of depression, hired out their slaves to work for other planters, to serve as construction gangs for railroads, to perform other duties of limited period. In certain cases, owners permitted their slaves to sell their own services and to keep the money they earned, often for the purpose of buying freedom. Life for the town slave and the hired slave was somewhat different than it was for his brother on the plantation. In some ways, he gained in independence and freedom, but his gains were precarious because he frequently lost the protection which the responsible planter gave to his own.

Many slaves worked on steamboats. Every boat had its own deck hands. If the boat belonged to an individual, the deck hands were his slaves; if the boat was owned by the company, they were often the property of the company.


Slavery in Alabama

On the average size wheel boat, there were about 30 or 35 deck hands. These men did the firing, loading of cotton, wood, etc, and the unloading. Each boat had 4 men called "stevedores" and 4 who were sometimes called "rollodores." These composed two different gangs, the rollodores business being to start the cotton down

-195-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Slavery in Alabama
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations viii
  • Introduction ix
  • Notes xxi
  • Preface xxv
  • Acknowledgements xxvii
  • I - In the Colonial and Territorial Periods 1
  • II - Plantations and Planters 19
  • III - The Work of the Plantation: Overseer and Slave 44
  • IV - The Slave and the Plantation 81
  • V - Traffic in Slaves 141
  • VI - Hired Slave and Town Slave 195
  • VII - The Legal Status of the Slave 215
  • VIII - Crimes and Punishments of Slaves 242
  • IX - Runaways 266
  • X - The Church and the Slave 294
  • XI - The Defense of Slavery 332
  • XII - The Free Negro in Alabama Before 1865 361
  • Bibliography 399
  • Index 411
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 428

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.